Posts Tagged ‘twins’

How does buying diapers support the March of Dimes?

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017

pampers photoToday’s guest post is written by Natalie Diaz, preemie mom, bestselling author of “What To Do When You’re Having Two” and founder of Twiniversity. Read her inspiring story below and how you can help support other families.

I’ve spent my share of time in the NICU; 31 days to be exact. Delivering my twins at exactly 34 weeks due to HELLP Syndrome (a variant of preeclampsia), my family got to learn the ins and outs of a section of the hospital I thought I would never want to visit, let alone stay in. In hindsight, the time I spent at the Mt. Sinai NICU in New York City was not only therapeutic for my twins, but life changing for me. The team there taught me more than I thought any new mom could learn; not just from the medical side of things, but also how to heal my heart emotionally after the trauma of an unexpected early delivery.

After the twins were born, I got involved with the March of Dimes. I participated in their “March for Babies” for years and raised money that went towards research, education, support, and advocacy to help preemie parents like myself. I know the only “cure” for my prenatal condition was the delivery of my twins, and perhaps just taking some literal steps could prevent that from happening to the next mom.

In 2009, I took my desire to help preemie twin parents a step further and launched Twiniversity. With over 60% of twin babies born prematurely, I wanted to offer a place online where families of twins could read about issues exclusive to our community and gain knowledge and insight, along with connections with other twin parents who’ve walked in their shoes. So not only could I support the March of Dimes during their annual walk, but now I could support families daily.

On July 11th, you can help support the March of Dimes without ever leaving your chair on Amazon’s Prime Day. Sign up for a new Pampers subscription on Amazon Prime Day and Pampers will donate $10 to the March of Dimes to support families with babies in the NICU – up to $160,000!

If you aren’t familiar with Prime Day, it’s an online shopping celebration exclusively for Amazon Prime Members, featuring amazing deals, exclusive opportunities, and now a way to give back. Not only can parents make sure their baby has the diapers they need at an affordable price by purchasing a Pampers subscription, but on Prime Day this purchase also provides information, expert advice, tools, and comfort for families with a sick or premature baby in the NICU as part of Pampers support of the March of Dimes.

Pampers will not just be making donations on Prime Day thanks to your subscriptions, but they will also host an hours long Facebook Live on the Pampers Facebook page, kicking off at 9am EST. With social media celebrity guests, real parents with real advice, and parenting experts, you can join the Prime Day party by tuning in and using the exclusive hashtag #Pampers4Preemies.

So join the Prime celebration, save money with Subscribe & Save, know your babies are covered with up to 12 hours of leak free protection from Pampers, and help support the March of Dimes all at the same time.

See you online on the 11th! I wouldn’t miss the Pampers Online Prime Day celebration for the world.

The March of Dimes does not endorse specific brands or products.

IVF, triplets and more

Monday, April 21st, 2014

In this video, Dr. Siobhan Dolan talks with a woman about fertility treatment and how to lower one’s chances of getting pregnant with twins, triplets or more.

Study shows progesterone shots do not reduce preterm delivery in twin pregnancies

Friday, February 22nd, 2013

While 17P, a form of progesterone, has been shown to prevent premature delivery among about one-third of women who are pregnant with a single baby and who have experienced a prior preterm delivery, the latest research shows that 17P prescriptions can’t do the same for moms having twins.

“Twins are very high risk for preterm delivery, in fact, 60 percent of twins are born too soon. We can’t assume that what works for singleton pregnancies will work with multiples such as twins or triplets,” says Edward R. B. McCabe, MD, PhD, March of Dimes senior vice president and medical director. “This research finding is valuable because it will guide the care of women with a multi-fetal pregnancy, and highlights the need to better understand how to prevent preterm births for multiples.”

“We found that 17P was not effective in women with twin pregnancies and a short cervix (defined as less than 25 mm between 24 and 32 weeks),” says Philippe Deruelle, MD, with the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Hôpital Jeanne de Flandre, Université Lille 2, France, and one of the study’s authors. “We actually seemed to have found an increase in the rate of preterm delivery before 32 weeks in the treatment group when compared to the non-treatment group.”

For the study, Dr. Deruelle and his colleagues conducted their trial on 165 women over the age of 18 at 10 university hospitals between June 2006 and January 2010. Outcome data was available for 161 of the 165 (97.6%) women. (The study’s title is Prevention of preterm delivery by 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate in asymptomatic twin pregnancies with a short cervix: a randomized controlled trial, and was presented at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s 33rd annual meeting last week.)

Dr. Deruelle recommends that women who know they are pregnant with twins get an ultrasound to measure their cervical length, as this factor has shown to predict which women with twins are at higher risk for premature pregnancy.

Hopefully, future research will help to shed light on ways to prevent pretem births for women who are pregnant with multiples.

Pregnant with multiples

Thursday, November 8th, 2012

tripletsBeing pregnant with one baby has its ups and downs, but twins, triplets and up can be a big challenge.

Today, more than 3 percent of babies in this country are born in sets of two, three or more; about 95 percent of these multiple births are twins. The high number of multiple pregnancies is a concern because women who are expecting more than one baby are at increased risk of certain pregnancy complications, including premature birth (before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy).

Women who are expecting multiples generally need to visit their health care providers more frequently than women expecting one baby. These extra visits can help prevent, detect and treat the complications that develop more often in a multiple pregnancy. Health care providers may recommend twice-monthly visits during the second trimester and weekly (or more frequent) visits during the third trimester.

Starting around the 20th week of pregnancy, a health care provider monitors the pregnant woman carefully for signs of preterm labor. He/she may do an internal exam or recommend a vaginal ultrasound to see if the woman’s cervix is shortening (a possible sign that labor may begin soon).

Even if a woman pregnant with multiples has no signs of preterm labor, her provider may recommend cutting back on activities sometime between the 20th and 24th weeks of pregnancy. She may be advised to reduce her activities even sooner and to rest several times a day if she is expecting more than two babies.

As a multiple gestation progresses, the health care provider regularly checks the pregnant woman’s blood pressure for preeclampsia. He/she also may recommend regular ultrasounds starting around 20 weeks of pregnancy to check that all babies are growing at about the same rate.

During the third trimester, the provider may recommend tests of fetal well-being. These include:
–  The non-stress test, which measures fetal heart rate when the baby is moving
–  The biophysical profile, which combines the non-stress test with an ultrasound

The chance of a cesarean birth is higher in twin than in singleton births. However, a pregnant woman has a good chance of having a normal vaginal delivery if both babies are in a head-down position and there are no other complications. When a woman is carrying three or more babies, a cesarean birth usually is recommended because it is safer for the babies.

To learn more about multiples, read this article.

Fertility and multiples

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012

In this video, Dr. Siobhan Dolan talks with a woman about fertility treatment and how to lower one’s chances of getting pregnant with twins, triplets or more.